REALTOR Challenge: How Well Do You Know the Industry?

2016 MetroTex Leadership Academy Grads to Shape the Association, Industry in an Era of Massive Growth for North Texas

If you’re not familiar with the MetroTex Leadership Academy graduates, you should be. They are the movers and shakers of North Texas real estate and they are shaping the future of the industry both in North Texas and nationwide. Designed to identify and develop future leaders for the Association, the Leadership Academy pushes members to become active in their communities, to get to know the legislative issues arising that impact homeowners, to become active in leadership roles within the Association and to become their best selves.


Leadership Academy students are expected to commit a significant amount of time and effort in the program; some participants go beyond the strict requirements to graduate with honors. These dedicated members embody the spirit of the Leadership Academy in a special way.
This year’s graduating class produced four amazing honors candidates. They’ve devoted hours to attend civic meetings, volunteer in our community, participated in MetroTex and TAR meetings, and read the words of respected business leaders, all while participating in the program and, oh by the way, running their businesses. 


So kudos to you, 2016 honors grads. You’ve accomplished a lot in 10 months! And congratulations to all of our 2016 MetroTex Leadership Academy graduates. We know you have a bright future ahead of you. 

There are 28 new graduates of the MetroTex Leadership Academy this year. Congratulations to the Class of 2016!

Aundrea Allen*                                                              Tamaria Johns*                                 
Ericka Alvarez                                                        Brenda Kronenberg*
Wanda Arias*                                                         David Lee*
Beth Arnold                                                           Kyle Lyo
Brandon Arnold*                                                   Paulette Mahome*
Kyle Baugh                                                            Chris Martinez*
Andrea Bell* Summa Cum Laude                         Gwen Moore* Cum Laude
Sabrina Bell Summa Cum Laude                          Grant Myers*
Carol Blair                                                              Amy Rakoczy
Matthew Byrd                                                        Leti Ramos Cum Laude
Jennifer Clark*                                                       Laura Stuckey*
Diane Davis*                                                          Chelsea Walley*
Ronnie Eckel*                                                         Maria Ward*
Laneal Ernest*
Jeff Fielde                                                              *Denotes perfect attendance.

 

 

 

Leasing & Property Management Series - Money Matters

Money matters.  Before preparing a lease for signature, you’ll want to have a conversation with your client about money.  You want to have clear communication in the written lease about when, where and in what form payments should be made and what fees will be charged for late or returned payments.

First, determine what forms of payment your client will accept.  Accepting cash payments for rent and providing a receipt is required, unless the lease specifically states that rent must be paid in another form.  If the tenant’s payment is returned, will your client pass on to their tenant the bank’s fee?  Fees for returned payments must be addressed in the written lease.

Security deposits and pet deposits must be held in a separate bank account for your client’s tenant.  Deposits are refundable at the end of a lease with an accounting made of any damages deposit funds were used to mitigate with receipts provided.  Your client must not comingle tenant deposits with personal funds under any circumstance.

Your client may choose to charge a cleaning fee or pet fee instead of a pet deposit.  Fees are not refundable and no accounting is required at move out, but they must be specifically stated in the written lease.

Decide when rent becomes late.  Texas Property Code says you must give 1 full day after the due date before you can begin charging late fees.  Many Landlords allow their tenants to be late with rent for a few days.  Late fees cannot be charged at all if they are not specifically addressed in a written lease.

State in the lease where the tenant should pay rent.  Some Landlords visit their properties each month to collect rent in person.  Others prefer their tenant mail the rent payment to their home or a P.O. Box.  Either way is acceptable, but must be addressed in the written lease.

A Professional Property Manager can handle money matters for your client.  The Property Manager collects all funds, protecting your client’s income and their privacy.  Property Managers have the training to prepare a lease that protects your client’s income through adherence to Property Code and best practices regarding the money matters of the lease.

Guest contributor Marye Davenport, Property Management Director 3G Properties